Fixed drug eruption

    Article Contributors: 
    Sean Klepper M.D.
    Stephen Lyle, M.D., ...

    Clinical Features:

    • Well-circumscribed plaques, most often on the extremities or genitalia, that arise acutely after exposure to the causative drug and are sometimes accompanied by pruritis or burning
    • If re-exposure to the same drug occurs, the lesions characteristically recur in the same location.
    • Blistering may occur.
    • Resolves with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.
    • The most commonly inciting drugs (among many others) are:
      • Barbiturates
      • Ibuprofen
      • Aspirin
      • Phenylbutazone
      • Sulfonamides
      • Tetracyline
      • Dapsone
      • Quinine
      • Phenolphthalein

    Histologic Features:

    • Marked basal cell hydropic degeneration with subepidermal vesiculation in later lesions
    • Lymphocyte tagging along the epidermodermal junction
    • Individual keratinocyte necrosis
    • Pigment incontinence
    • Mixed upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, histiocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils
    External Links:

    Cases associated with this book:

  • Fixed drug eruption
    Author: Stephen Lyle, M.D., Ph.D.
    Conference: DermatopathologyConsultations.com Teaching Collection
  • Fixed drug eruption
    Author: Stephen Lyle, M.D., Ph.D.

    Conference: DermatopathologyConsultations.com Teaching Collection